Dr. Saad Saad- His Advice For Children Who Swallow Objects

Dr. Saad Saad has been an excellent and well-known pediatric surgeon for more than 40 years. He has vast experience and knowledge on how to remove foreign objects from an esophagus and trachea. During his 40 years, Dr. Saad has helped more than 1,000 kids from ages six months up to 14 years old. Many of these children unfortunately got food or other objects lodged in their trachea or esophagus. He was recently interviewed and asked to answer some specific questions about kids and getting food stuck in their throats based on his extensive expertise.

 

What Happens After A Child Swallows Something They Shouldn’t?

 

Kids can be super curious as they grow up. This curiosity, however, can lead to dangerous occurrences. One such dangerous occurrence is when a child put something in their mouth that they shouldn’t. If the item is small, the object can typically pass down the throat and into the stomach with no serious complications afterwards. However, sometimes the item may be too big for the child to swallow and will end up getting stuck.

 

Common signs that a child has an object stuck in their food pipe are trouble swallowing, difficulties breathing and wheezing. In his many years of experience, Dr. Saad Saad has noticed many common objects and food items that children will typically get stuck in their throats. Some of these include coins, peanuts and hot dogs.

 

Children Under Six Years Old

 

For children under the age of six that get something stuck in their windpipe or food pipe, you can get the object dislodged by turning them upside down and holding them by their legs. While you are holding them upside down, smack your hand on the middle of their back. Typically, this is all that is needed to get the object unstuck.

 

Older Children And Adults

 

For older kids and adults that get something stuck in their esophagus or trachea, it is necessary to perform the Heimlich on them. This is done by standing behind them and locating their abdomen just below the rib cage. Once found, use both hands linked together to thrust in and upward into their body. This can help them forcefully cough the object out. If this doesn’t help after a few attempts, a call to emergency services or a trip to the emergency room should be the next step.

 

Tip For Small Children

 

If you notice them swallowing something that they should not, do not try and scoop out that object using your fingers. This could end up lodging it further in. When all else fails, go to the nearest emergency room for help as quick as possible. Learn more : https://angel.co/saad-saad-2